Naturality Candles

100% Soy Candles USA

Soy Candles made with 100 Percent Soy Wax have Many Advantages 

Finding 100% soy candles USA based is getting easier all the time. People are becoming increasingly aware of home pollutants. Candles are a very real source of indoor pollutions and 100% soy candles are known to create much less soot than regular paraffin ones.

If you haven’t tried soy candles yet, whether you live in the USA or other places in the world, you will be pleasantly surprised at how nicely they burn. Less pollution is only one benefit: longer burn time is another bonus. Although soy based candles are generally a little more expensive than their paraffin counterparts, you gain a considerable amount of extra burn time.

When looking for candles that are 100% soy wax, also find out what the wick is made of. Unfortunately some wicks are still made with the inclusion of lead. Lead is a very toxic material, and it is worth putting a bit of extra effort into finding lead-free wicks. We believe that one day lead will be banned from candle wicks, but until then buy from sources using alternative methods. Luckily, most soy candle manufacturers are also very health and environment conscious and use cleaner burning wicks.

Many USA based companies specialize in soy candles. Kerryscentedcandles.com carries a huge line of scented soy candles with over 170 different scents. The Lakeshore Candle Company carries candles made with a blend of soy and high quality vegetable waxes. They use cotton and paper core wicks and the candles are made in the US state of Michigan.

Itsasoy.com makes and sells 100% soy wax jar candles. They designed their line around a very strong dislike of soot in their house, and they tweaked their products through personal use. You can purchase itsasoy products online or in a variety of stores across the country.

Buying United States based soy candles also helps support local industry. The above are just a few examples of the many companies focusing on healthier, higher quality candles.

Last Updated ( Sunday, 11 January 2009 )
 
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